Monday, August 31, 2020

MOVIE ROB's GENRE GRANDEUR FOR AUGUST: Medical Dramas



Each month at MovieRob's site a different film genre is explored through recommendations and blog articles. This month I was pleased to select the topic of Medical Dramas.

Link HERE to access the varied films from different eras devoted to the topic. Get your drink and snacks now because there is a lot of interesting reading ahead.


My contributions are the prize-winning Men in White, 1934, and an undercover caper, The Sleeping City, 1950.












6 comments:

  1. CLARK GABLE & MYRNA LOY(MEN IN WHITE) both got to work with one of our favorites-DORIS DAY. Gable starred with Doris in TEACHER'S PET. Myrna played a supporting role as the aunt in MIDNIGHT LACE.

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    1. A tribute to the longevity of both of their careers is that they were still important actors in the 1950s and 1960s.

      Clark and Myrna made 7 movies together. Along with Men and White, 1934 also saw them in Manhattan Melodrama, her first with Bill Powell.

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  2. As you know Bill was engaged to JEAN HARLOW at the time of her death in 1937. How many movies did GABLE and Harlow do together? Gable was in Harlow's last movie. I remember you didn't care for THE MISFITS which was the last movie for both GABLE and MARILYN MONROE. GABLE was his usual attractive self and Marilyn looked beautiful. Reviews at that time mentioned Marilyn's shape. She wore a two-piece swim suit and some critics thought she looked chubby. That doesn't have anything to do with her acting, obviously.

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    1. I only remembered a couple off the top of my head, but Clark and Jean appeared together in 6 movies. My favourite is Red Dust. Their first was The Secret Six followed by Hold Your Man, China Seas, then Wife vs. Secretary and the ill-fated Saratoga.

      People are always too quick to pick on someone because of their weight. I think Marilyn looked fine in The Misfits.

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  3. Really enjoyed both your posts on these medical films. I recall Sleeping City as one of the wave of on-location 1940s noirs that created such a gritty sense of reality because of being filmed where reality itself happens. Richard Conte is always such a solid actor - a case of a performer fitting the era in which he performed. I haven't yet seen Men in White, but your essay had such fascinating background detail on the film's links to the Group Theater and Stanislavski, so now it's a must-see!

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    1. Thanks for following me far afield.

      All of his work in the era makes Conte my personal King of Noir. John Alexander is a favourite of mine, and he had a pretty decent role as the police inspector.

      Men in White is very emotional and sincere. Gable handled this role very well.

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